18th Commonwealth Forestry Conference, Edinburgh. 28 June - 2 July 2010.

Programme

Scroll down the page to view the complete conference programme, or to navigate quickly to a specific day, please select from below.

> Go to Monday 28 June > Go to Thursday 1 July
> Go to Tuesday 29 June > Go to Friday 2 July (Field Trips)
> Go to Wednesday 30 June > Go to Side Events

Sunday 27 June 2010
Early Registration

14.00-17.00

Registration Open for Main Conference

Strathblane Hall, EICC


Monday 28 June 2010
Side Event

09.30 – 10.30

Old Research – The New Source of Evidence

Sponsored by Oxford University and the Forestry Commission

This session is open to all delegates although places will be limited.

Carrick


Monday 28 June 2010
MAIN CONFERENCE
Challenges and Opportunities
08.00 –-19.15 Registration Strathblane Hall
08.00 –17.00 Speaker Preview Room Open Harris I

10.30 – 19.15

Exhibition & Poster Areas Open

Strathblane Hall

11.00 – 12.30

 

Session 1
Forests and the Commonwealth:
Our Common Future

11.00 – 11.15: Welcome and Introduction
Pamela Warhurst, Chair, Forestry Commission of Great Britain

11.15 – 11.25: Ministerial Address
Roseanna Cunningham, Scottish Government Minister for the Environment, UK

11.25 – 11.35: Video Message
His Royal Highness, The Prince of Wales

11.35 – 11.55: Keynote Speaker
Kamalesh Sharma, Commonwealth Secretary-General

11.55 – 12.10: Conference Aims and Objectives
Tim Rollinson, Director General, Forestry Commission of Great Britain and Chairman of the Standing Committee on Commonwealth Forestry

12.10 – 12.20: Queen’s Award for Forestry
Presentation to Award winner

12.20 – 12.30: Entertainment - A Short Programme of Traditional Scottish Songs performed by pupils from North Berwick High School (click on link to view a YouTube video of the perfomance).

Pentland Auditorium

12.30 – 14.00 Buffet Lunch/Exhibition & Posters Strathblane Hall

14.00 – 15.30


Session 2
Global Challenges: The Case for Action

14.00 – 14.05: Introduction
Chair: Hosny El Lakany, Director International Programme, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Canada

14.05 – 14.25: Bill Jackson, Deputy Director General, (IUCN) International Union for Conservation of Nature

14.25 – 14.45: Eduardo Rojas-Briales, Assistant Director-General, (FAO) Food and Agriculture Organization

14.45 – 15.05: Jan McAlpine, Director, United Nations Forum on Forests Secretariat

15.05 – 15.30: Panel Discussion

Pentland Auditorium

15.30 – 16.00

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Sponsored by sponsor

Strathblane Hall

16.00 – 17.45



 


 

 

 

 

Session 3
Our Experience: A Wealth of Opportunity

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction
Chair: Bill Jackson, Deputy Director General, International Union for Conservation of Nature

16.05 – 16.35: Hope in a Changing Climate
John Liu, Director, Environmental Education Media Project, University of Reading, UK

16.35 – 16.55: A World of Opportunity: The Potential for Restoration
Tim Rollinson, Chair, The Global Partnership on Forest Landscape Restoration and Director General, Forestry Commission of Great Britain

16.55 – 17.15: How Civil Society can Shape our Future
Mark Collins, Director, Commonwealth Foundation

17.15 – 17.35: Panel Discussion

17.35 – 17.45: An Introduction to Commonwealth Forests 2010
Jim Ball, Chair, Commonwealth Forestry Association

Pentland Auditorium

17.45 – 19.15

Welcome Reception and Official Poster Viewing Session
(authors will be by their posters)

Strathblane Hall

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Tuesday 29 June 2010
Rising to the Challenge
08.30 -18.30 Registration Strathblane Hall
08.30 –17.00 Speaker Preview Room Open Harris I

08.30 –17.45

Exhibition & Poster Areas Open

Strathblane Hall

09.00 - 10.30

 

Session 4
Learning From Each Other

09.00 – 09.05: - Introduction
Chair: Mark Collins, Director, Commonwealth Foundation

Case studies showcasing a range of experiences from across the Commonwealth

09.05 – 09.25: Canada
Jim Farrell, Assistant Deputy Minister, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Government of Canada, Canada

09.25 – 09.45: Rwanda
Frank Rutabingwa, Director General, National Forestry Authority, Rwanda

09.45 – 10.05: India
P J Dilip Kumar, Director General of Forests and Special Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India, India

10.05 – 10.25: Tanzania
Felician Kilahama, Director of Forestry and Beekeeping, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, Tanzania

10.25 – 10.30 Brunei Darussalam - Custodian of the Rainforest - A Short Video

Pentland Auditorium

10.30 – 11.00

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Sponsored by sponsor

Strathblane Hall

11.00 – 12.30


Session 5
Connecting Business, Finance and Forestry

11.00 – 11.05: Introduction
Chair:
Jan McAlpine, Director, United Nations Forum on Forests Secretariat

11.05 – 11.25: Forestry – Ecosystem and Economic Resilience
Justin Mundy, Director, The Prince’s Charities International Sustainability Unit, UK

11.25 – 11.45: Forest Carbon and Biodiversity – A Practical Business Perspective
Adam Whitmore, Head of Strategic Climate Change Projects, Rio Tinto plc

11.45 – 12.05: High Conservation Value Areas and Ecosystem Restoration – Landscape Applications Illustrating Effective Conservation Measures and the “Internalising of Some of the Externalities” in Commercial Forestry Operations
Peter Gardiner, Natural Resources Manager, Mondi plc

12.05 – 12.30: Panel Discussion

Pentland Auditorium

12.30 – 14.00

12.45 – 13.30

Bag Lunch/Posters & Exhibition

Side Event: The Iwokrama Model: Using a Forest without Losing it
(Lunch can be taken into the room).

Strathblane Hall

Tinto

14.00 – 15.30

Session 6
Combating Climate Change: The Evidence

14.00 – 14.05: Introduction
Chair:
Jim Farrell, Assistant Deputy Minister, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Government of Canada

14.05 – 14.30: Forests in the Fight Against Climate Change – a UK perspective
Sir David Read, Emeritus Professor of Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield,UK

14.30 – 14.55: Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development
Isabella Bovolo and Elizabeth Losos, Resident Scientists, Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation & Development, Guyana
Professor Thomas Wagner, Chair, International Iwokrama Science Committee and Professor of Earth System Sciences at the School of Civil Engineering & Geosciences at Newcastle University, UK

14.55 – 15.15: Ghana
Adewale Adeleke, Forest Governance Thematic Coordinator, IUCN West and Central Africa Programme, Ghana

15.15-15.30: Panel Discussion

Pentland Auditorium

15.30 – 16.00

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Strathblane Hall

16.00 – 17.25

Session 7 - (Parallel Sessions)
Fighting Climate Change: The Evidence

Session 7.1 – Impacts and Resilience

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction
Chair: Philip Goodwin, Chief Executive Officer, TREE AID

16.05 – 16.25: O-1 Where Do We Go? Developing Resilient Future Forests: A Case Study from British Columbia, Canada
Harry Nelson, University of British Columbia, Canada

16.25 – 16.45: O-2 Forest Restoration to Improve Health and Resilience and Reduce Fire Risks in Naturally Grassy Forest Ecosystems
Peter St. Clair, Forests New South Wales, Australia

16.45 – 17.05: O-3 Impact of Climate Change on “Sundarban”, the Largest Mangrove Forest: Ways Forward
Syed Azizul Haq, National Housing Authority, Bangladesh

17.05 – 17.25: O-4 Increasing Resilience to Climate Change of a Kenyan Biodiversity Hotspot through Forest Restoration
Winfred Musila, National Museums of Kenya, Kenya

Sidlaw
16.00 – 17.45

Session 7.2 – Mitigation

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction
Chair: Mark Broadmeadow, Climate Change, Programme Manager, Forestry Commission England

16.05 – 16.25: O-5 Beyond Forest Restoration for Climate-Change Mitigation and Adaptation
Peter Duinker, Dalhousie University, Canada

16.25 – 16.45: O-6 Mitigating Climate Change by Restoring Degraded Forest Areas in Cameroon
Akompab Ebainjuiayuk Benjamin, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

16.45 – 17.05: O-7 The Demand for Climate Change Mitigation in Ghana’s Forested Regions
Jonathan Quartey, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana

17.05 – 17.25: O-8 Carbon Sequestration Benefits of New Native Woodland Expansion in Scotland
Mike Perks, Forest Research, UK

17.25 – 17.45: O-9 Mitigating Climate Change: What Role the Cocoa Farmer in West Africa can Play?
Mustapha Seidu, WWF West Africa Forest Programme Office, University of Ghana

Tinto
16.00 – 17.45

Session 7.3 – Adapting our Forests

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction
Chair: Tiina Vahanen, Senior Officer, UN-REDD Programme Secretariat, Switzerland

16.05 – 16.25: O-10 Climate Change and Urban Forests: Toward a Framework for Urban Sustainable Forest Management
Camilo Ordonez, Dalhousie University, Canada

16.25 – 16.45: O-11 Climate Change Adaptation Through Sustainable Forest Management: A Case Study of Sui River Forest Reserve, Ghana
Albert Ahenkan, International Centre for Enterprise and Sustainable Development, Ghana

16.45 – 17.05: O-12 Access to Data: Challenges in Data Management in Supporting Forest Restoration and Climate Change Mitigation
Roger Mills, University of Oxford, UK

17.05 – 17.25: O-13 Analysing Forest Sustainability Under Various Climate Change Scenarios: A Case Study in Northern Scotland
Stefania Pizzirani, Forestry Research , UK

17.25 – 17.45: O-14 Long Term Biodiversity Planning and Monitoring of New Native Woodlands
Mike Smith, Forest Research, UK

Moorfoot
16.00 – 17.45

Session 7.4 – The Role of Finance

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction
Chair: Tony Bartlett, General Manager, Business Systems, Australian Government Land and Coasts

16.05 – 16.25: O-15 Opportunities for Forest Finance Under The International Climate Change Regime
Rowena Maguire, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

16.25 – 16.45: O-16 Financing Restoration of Casuarina Trees for Dunes Stabilization and Erosion Control in Inhambane (Mozambique)
Osvaldo Manso, National Directorate of Land and Forests, Mozambique

16.45 – 17.05: O-17 Creating Bottom of The Pyramid Forestry Business Solutions to: Reforestation, Climate Security, Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Industrial Supply Chains
Nicholas Pyatt, 2050 Ventures, UK

17.05 – 17.25: O-18 A Ugandan Model for Engaging the Private Sector in Commercial Tree Growing
Paul Jacovelli, SPGS, Uganda

17.25 – 17.45: O-19 Restoring the Indian Forests Through Microfinance
Krishan Kumar Kaushal, Indian Forest Service, India

Fintry
18.00 – 19.30 Commonwealth Forestry Association AGM followed by a short Reception –
All Members Welcome. 
Carrick

18.45 – 20.00

Institute of Chartered Foresters President’s Reception (by invitation only)

Kilsyth

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Wednesday 30 June 2010
People and Forests
08.30 - 18.00 Registration Strathblane Hall
08.30 - 17.00 Speaker Preview Room Open Harris I

08.30 - 17.45

Exhibition & Poster Areas Open

Strathblane Hall

09.00 - 10.30

Session 8
People and Forests: Sharing Knowledge

09.00 – 09.05: Introduction
Chair: John Innes, Vice-Chair, Commonwealth Forestry Association

09.05 – 09.20: Forestry Education, Leadership, Institutions and the Future
Hosny El Lakany, Director International Programme, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Canada 

09.20 – 09.35: Education and Training for Forestry and Forests Products Industries in Malysia
Mahmud Hj Sudin, Dean, School of International Tropical Forestry, University of Malaysia Sabah (UMS), Malaysia 

09.35 – 09.50: Perspectives of Students on Commonwealth Forests: A Glimpse into the Future
Julius Adewopo, , Graduate Student, University of Arkansas, U.S.A., CFA Liaison Officer, International Forestry Students ‘Association (IFSA)

09.50 – 10.05: North American Perspective
Jack Saddler, Dean, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Canada

 10.05 - 10.20: Forestry Education in Africa. State and Prospect, Outcome of Discussion at The Northern African Regional Meeting O-20
Tolulope Daramola, Federal University of Technology, Nigeria

10.20 – 10.30: Questions

Pentland Auditorium

10.30 - 11.00

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Strathblane Hall

11.00 – 13.00




 


 

 

Session 9
People and Forests: Raising Standards

11.00 – 11.05: Introduction:
Chair: Tony Bartlett, General Manager, Business Systems, Australian Government Land and Coasts

11.05 – 11.20: Defining Professionalism in Forestry and Identifying Implications for the Future: A View From the Caribbean
Marilyn Headley, Chief Conservator of Forests, Jamaica

11.20 – 11.35: Forestry Professional Bodies – A View from a New Zealand Forester
Andrew McEwen, President, New Zealand Institute of Forestry, New Zealand

11.35 – 11.50: Experiences and Challenges of Professional Forestry Associations in Commonwealth Member Countries in Africa
Ben Chikamai, Director, Kenya Forestry Research Institute, Kenya

11.50 – 12.05: Professionalism: What do we mean by it?
Shireen Chambers, Executive Director, Institute of Chartered Foresters, UK

12.05 – 12.20: Professionalising the Forest Service - Indian Perspective O-21
Arvind Singh, Ministry of Environment and Forests, India

12.20 – 13.00: Panel Discussion

Pentland Auditorium

13.00 – 14.30 Bag Lunch, Posters, Exhibition & Side Events Strathblane Hall
 

Side Events – Lunch can be taken into the meeting rooms during these sessions

 
13.15 – 14.20

CFA-ICF - Informal Meeting of Representatives of National Forestry Institutions & Associations (By invitation only)

Moorfoot
13.05 – 14.25 IUCN - Breaking Down the Barriers to Locally Driven Restoration: The Key to Responding to Climate Change Tinto
13.05 – 14.25

IUCN-WCPA - Specialist Group on Cultural & Spiritual Values of Protected Areas: Conserving the Commonwealth’s Sacred Forests as Nodes of Resilience to Climate Change: Towards a Strategy and Action Plan

Kilsyth

13.05 – 14.05

CHEC - Tropical Field Station: Initiative for a Commonwealth Interchange on Tropical Rainforest Sustainable Management & Research

Carrick

14.30 – 16.00

Session 10
People and Forests: Engaging Communities

14.30 – 14.35: Introduction
Chair: Penny Davies, Senior Forestry Adviser, Department for International Development , UK

14.35 – 15.00: Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development
Sydney Allicock, Director Surama Eco -Tourism, Guyana, & Dane Gobin, Iwokrama International Rainforest Programme, Guyana

15.00 – 15.25: Creating Woodlands for Wildlife and People in Scotland
Sir Michael Strang Steel, Scottish Forest Alliance, UK

15.25 – 15.50: Facilitating Communities to Restore Forest Landscape Functions as a Livelihoods Strategy - A Case of Benet Community, Mount Elgon, Uganda
Barbara Nakangu Bugembe, Senior Programme Officer, IUCN Project Office, Uganda

15.50 – 16.00: Panel Discussion

Pentland Auditorium

16.00 – 16.30

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Strathblane Hall

16.30 – 18.15

Session 11
(Parallel Sessions)
People and Forests: Engaging Communities

11.1 – Community Participation

16.30 – 16.35: Introduction
Chair: Dominic Driver, Policy and Programmes Manager, Policy and Programmes Group, Forestry Commission England

16.35 – 16.55: O-22 Restoring Degraded Land in the Shire Valley: Lessons for Community Led Initiatives that Link Restoration and the Development of Sustainable Livelihoods
Jonah Chimusoro, Environmental Technologies ENTECH, Malawi

16.55 – 17.15: O-23 Assessment of Forest Restoration Initiatives Undertaken by Village Communities In Hazaribag West Forest Division, State of Jharkhand, India
Diksha Kumari Prasad, Government of Jharkhand, India

17.15 – 17.35: O-24 Paradise Regained by Ethical Alliance of Hill Farm Women: A Case Study of Sustainable Management of Common Property Resources and Social Entrepreneurship  
Sushil Kumar, Forest Department, India

17.35 – 17.55: O-25 Rural Women Empowerment Amidst Forest Restoration in Omo Forest Reserve (SNR1) in Nigeria
Tayo Olubunmi Iretiolu, University of Lagos, Nigeria

17.55 – 18.15: O-26 Community Knowledge Garden: A Participatory Approach of Restoration And Conservation of Forest Biodiversity To Sustain Livelihoods of Tribal Communities in Eastern Himalayas
Ranjay Kumar Singh, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, India

Sidlaw
16.30 – 18.15

11.2 – The Value of Community Engagement

16.30 – 16.35: Introduction
Chair: Marilyn Headley, Chief Conservator of Forests, Jamaica

16.35 – 16.55: O-27 Community Engagement in Support of Forest Landscape Restoration: The Experience of the International Model Forest Network
Peter Besseau, Canadian Forest Service, Canada

16.55 – 17.15: O-28 Restoring the Connections: People and Forests
Elizabeth Shortall, Scottish Forest Alliance, UK

17.15 – 17.35: O-29 Restoration of Degraded Forest Landscape in Eastern Upland of Bangladesh Using Community Management Practices
Khaled Misbahuzzaman, Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Bangladesh

17.35 – 17.55: O-30 Community Participation in Restoring Australian Forest Landscapes
Tony Bartlett, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia

17.55 – 18.15: O-31 Impact Evaluation of Community Forestry in Northwest Pakistan: The Livelihoods and Institutional Perspective
Khurram Iqbal, University of Agriculture, Pakistan

Tinto
16.30 – 18.15

11.3 – Engagement in Practice

16.30 – 16.35: Introduction
Chair: James Mayers, Head, Natural Resources Group, International Institute for Environment and Development

16.35 – 16.55: O-32 Community-Based Peri-Urban Forest Restoration Programme: A Case Study in Ambilipitiya, Sri Lanka
Mangala De Zoysa, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka

16.55 – 17.15: O-33 The Social and Environmental Effects of Different Kinds of Community Forestry in The United Kingdom 
Anna Lawrence, Forestry Commission, UK

17.15 – 17.35: O-34 Role of Participatory Modelling in Reducing Community Controversy Surrounding the Expansion of Plantation Forestry
Andrea Leys, Cooperative Research Centre for Forestry, Australia

17.35 – 17.55: O-35 Joint Forest Management, Deforestation and Local People Participation: A Case Study in West Bengal, India
Jyotish Prakash Basu, West Bengal State University, India

17.55 – 18.15: O-36 Enhancing Women Participation for Forest Restoration in Hilly Regions of India  
Pratima Singh, Natural Resources Management Group, India

Carrick
16.30 – 18.15

11.4 – Helping Society to Adapt

16.30 – 16.35: Introduction
Chair: James Pendlebury, Chief Executive, Forest Research, Great Britain

16.35 – 16.55: O-37 Rehabilitation of State Forests for the Benefit of Communities in South Africa
Sibongile Mavimbela, Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, South Africa

16.55 – 17.15: O-38 Community Based Adaptation of Tribal Women to Climate Change in Semi-Arid Rajasthan, India
Purabi Bose, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

17.15 – 17.35: O-39 Projected Impacts of Climate Change on Forests Within a Small Island Commonwealth State
Shobha Maharaj, University of Oxford, UK

17.35 – 17.55: O-40 Volunteering and Forest Restoration: How Participation can Help Change Individuals, Communities and Society
Alan Watson Featherstone, Trees for Life Scotland, UK

17.55 – 18.15: O-41 Community Benefits from Forest Restoration: A Case Study of Nivas Block, Mandla, Madhya Pradesh in India  
Pratibha Bhatnagar, State Forest Research Institute, India

Fintry

19.30 – 22.30

BPReception & Dinner - sponsored by BP

Moorfoot

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Thursday 1 July 2010
Delivering Change
08.30 -17.00 Registration Strathblane Hall

08.30 –16.00

Speaker Preview Room Open

Harris I

08.30 – 16.00

Exhibition & Poster Area Open

Strathblane Hall

09.00 - 10.30

Session 12
Delivering REDD+:
From Copenhagen to Cancun

Special Session Organised jointly with the University of Edinburgh

09.00 – 09.05: Introduction
Chair
: John Hudson

09.05 – 09.20: Introduction to REDD +
Genevieve Patenaude, Forest and Carbon Management, The University of Edinburgh, UK

09.20 – 09.35: Guyana Country Perspective on REDD+ :
James Singh, Commissioner of Forests, Guyana

09.35 – 09.50: Tanzania Country Perspective on REDD+
Felician Kilahama, Head, Forest Service, Tanzania

cfa09.50 – 10.05: Update on UN-REDD Programme Forests and Climate Change:
Ravi Prabhu Senior Programme Officer, Forests and Climate Change, UN-REDD Programme - Supported by the Commonwealth Forestry Association

10.05 – 10.30: Norway’s REDD Leadership
Hans Brattskar, Ambassador and Director, Government of Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative

Pentland Auditorium

10.30 - 11.00

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Strathblane Hall

11.00 – 12.45

Session 13 (Parallel Sessions)
Delivering Change

13.1 Delivering REDD+: from Copenhagen to Cancun

11.00 – 11.05: Introduction
Chair: Penny Davies, Senior Forestry Adviser, Department for International Development, UK

Presentations and Perspectives On:

11.05-11.35: Finance and Investments
Andrew Mitchell, Director, Global Canopy Programme, UK
Christopher Webb, Manager, Sustainability and Climate Change, PricewaterhouseCoopers/Carbon Markets and Investors Association, UK

11.35 – 11.50: Socio-Economy, Policy and Governance
James Mayers, Head, Natural Resources Group, International Institute for Environment and Development

11.50 – 12.05: Forest Ecosystems and Services
Patrick Meir, University of Edinburgh, UK

12.05 – 12.20: Earth Observation and Technologies
Stephen Ward, GEO Forest Carbon Tracking, Australia

12.20 – 12.45: Panel Discussion

Carrick

11.00 – 12.45

13.2 - Delivering Change: Institutional Settings and Good Governance

11.00 – 11.05: Introduction
Chair: Jim Carle, Leader, Forest Management Team, Forestry Department, United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization

11.05 – 11.25: O-42 Forest Restoration Through Traditional Institutions in Nigeria: Challenges and Prospects
Shadrach Akindele, Federal University of Technology, Nigeria

11.25 – 11.45: O-43 The Forest Rights Act: Combining Forest Conservation with Human Development
Dusmanta Giri, Schumacher Centre, India

11.45 – 12.05: O-44 Developing A New Generation of Forestry Institutions: Using Complexity and Systems Approaches to Building Institutions that can Cope with Change and Uncertainty
Patrick Abbot, LTS International Ltd, UK

12.05 – 12.25: O-45 Poverty and Institutional Management Stand-Off: A Restoration and Conservation Dilemma for Mangrove Forests of Tanzania
Mwita Mangora, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

12.25 – 12.45: O-46 Forest Restoration and Armed Conflicts: Challenges and Policy Options for India
Neela Mukherjee, Development Tracks RTC, India

Fintry

11.00 – 12.45

13.3 - Delivering Change: Forestry Management - Challenges and the Future

11.00 – 11.05: Introduction
Chair: Laura Jones, Head of Policy and Programmes, Forestry Commission England

11.05 – 11.25: O-47 Why The Change After A Century: Kenyan Experience On Initiatives to Change Forestry Management Approach 
Mbuvi Musingo Tito Edward, Kenya Forestry Research Institute, Kenya

11.25 – 11.45: O-48 Decentralized Forest Management: Implications On Tribal Communities of Rajasthan In India
Purabi Bose, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

11.45 – 12.05: O-49 Protecting Jamaica's Forest Resources, One Local Forest Management Committee At A Time
Rainee Oliphant, Forestry Department, Jamaica

12.05 – 12.25: O-50 Forest Restoration in The UK: A Non-Government Perspective
Hilary Allison, Woodland Trust, UK

12.25 – 12.45: O-51 Making Them Work Better: Capacity Building of Women Frontline Staff Through Gender Sensitive Forest Governance
Suvarna Chandrappagari, Andhra Pradesh Forest Academy, India

Sidlaw

12.45 – 13.45

Buffet Lunch, Posters and Exhibition

Strathblane Hall

13.45 – 15.30

Session 14 (Parallel Sessions)
Delivering Change

14.1 – Building Better Institutions and Governance

13.45 – 13.50: Introduction
Chair
: David Henderson-Howat, Policy, Forestry Commission Scotland

13.50 – 14.10: O-52 Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation: Institutional Perspectives On Opportunities and Challenges in The Congo Basin
H Carolyn Peach Brown, University of Guelph, Canada

14.10 – 14.30: O-53 Strengthening Capacity Building in the Forestry Department of Peninsular Malaysia in Meeting Emerging Forestry Issues
Abdulrahman Bin Abdulrahim, Forestry Department of Peninsular Malaysia, Malaysia

14.30 – 14.50: O-54 ‘Dis Wood Kyan Dun: Intended and Unintended Consequences for Logging and REDD of the Common Belief in Inexhaustible Natural Tropical Forest in Guyana
Janette Bulkan, Colby College, USA

14.50 – 15.10: O-55 "We Don't Do Annual Reports Now".  Documenting Trends in the State of Forest Management in Public Forest Assets and Private Forest Enterprises.  How REDD Might Make a Positive Difference
John Palmer, Forest Management Trust, USA

15.10– 15.30: O-56 The Efficacy of Forest Law Enforcement and Economic Incentives to Prevent Illegal Logging in Developing States.  Lessons Learned From in and Around Two Conservation Areas of North-East Bangladesh
Sharif Ahmed Mukul, Institute of International Forestry and Forest Products, Dresden University of Technology, Germany

Sidlaw

13.45 – 15.10

14.2 – Valuing and Paying for Forests

13.45 – 13.50: Introduction
Chair: Pat Snowdon, Economic & Climate Change Advisor, Forestry Commission of Great Britain

13.50 – 14.10: O-57 Climate Change, Forest Restoration and Payment for Ecosystem Services     
Maharaj Muthoo, Hari Environment & Development Society, India

14.10 – 14.30: O-58 Economic Valuation, Green Accounting and Payment for Environmental Services - Gears of The Toolkit for Tackling Impacts Climate Change in Himalayan Forests of India
Madhu Verma, Indian Institute of Forest Management, India

14.30 – 14.50: O-59 Can Compensation for Tropical Forest ‘Ecosystem Services' Help Reduce Vulnerability to Changes in Climate and Land Use?
Patrick Meir, University of Edinburgh, UK

14.50 – 15.10: O-60 Rubber Planting for Forest Rehabilitation and Enhancement of Community Livelihood: A Comparative Study in Three South Asian Countries
Tapan Kumar Nath, University of Chittagong, Bangladesh

Tinto

13.45 – 15.10

14.3 – Improving Livelihoods

13.45 – 13.50: Introduction
Chair: Wilma Harper, Head of Corporate and Forestry Support, Forestry Commission of Great Britain

13.50 – 14.10: O-61 Forest Protection and Livelihood: An Investigation Applying Discrete Dependent Variable Models
Mohammad Safa, University of Queensland, Australia

14.10 – 14.30: O-62 Climate Change: Also An Opportunity for Poverty Alleviation
Muino Taquidir, Envirotrade, Mozambique

14.30 – 14.50: O-63 Initiatives of NABARD in Restoring Degraded Lands with Community Participation Through Afforestation and Reforestation (AR) Activities Under Watershed Approach in India
M S Haque, National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development, India

14.50 – 15.10: O-64 Experiences of A Research Institute in Forest Restoration Practices in Nigeria
Ogunjobi Johnson, Federal College of Wildlife Management, Nigeria

Moorfoot

13.45 – 15.10

14.4 – Restoration: Practical Experiences

13.45 – 13.50: Introduction
Chair: Shashi Kant, Professor of Forest Resource Economics, University of Toronto, Canada

13.50 – 14.10: O-65 A 5-Year Pilot Project for Avoiding Deforestation and Restoring Woodlands in Africa
John Grace, University of Edinburgh, UK

14.10 – 14.30: O-66 Using Remote Sensing to Map Forest Cover Change in Savannah Woodland: A Case Study in Malawi
Gemma Cassells, University of Edinburgh, UK

14.30 – 14.50: O-67 Reliable Forest Carbon Monitoring - Applying A Participatory Evidence-Based Framework to Validate the Knowledge Base
Gillian Petrokofsky, University of Oxford, UK

14.50 – 15.10: O-68 Achieving Forest Restoration and Social Development Through Reducing Emissions From Deforestation and Degradation in Malawi
Philippa Lincoln, LTS International, UK

Fintry
13.45 –  15.30 14.5 – Delivering REDD+: From Copenhagen to Cancun
(Edinburgh University workshop session by invitation only)
Carrick

15.30 – 16.00

Tea/Coffee/Exhibition & Posters

Strathblane Hall

16.00 – 17.00

14.5 - Continued
(Edinburgh University workshop session by invitation only)

Kilsyth

16.00 – 17.00

Session 15
Bringing Solutions Together: Our Common Future

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction
Chair:
Pamela Warhurst, Chair, Forestry Commission of Great Britain

16.05 – 16.35: Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity
Pavan Sukhdev, Study Leader – TEEB, Special Advisor & Head- Green Economy Initiative, UNEP, UK

16.35 – 16.55: Conference Summary
Tim Rollinson, Director General, Forestry Commission of Great Britain and Chairman
of the Standing Committee on Commonwealth Forestry, UK

16.55 – 17.00: Closing Remarks

Pentland Auditorium

19.00 – 21.00

Reception hosted by the Scottish Government Minister for Environment
(by invitation only)

Great Hall,
Edinburgh Castle

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Friday 2  July 2010
Optional Field Trips

There is no fee to participate in one of the trips for delegates and their registered accompanying persons, however they must be pre-booked.  Please check at the Registration Desk for late availability.

Useful Information: As the tours will take you outdoors, we recommend you bring suitable waterproof clothing and footwear.

For full day field trips, a simple light lunch will be provided en route. Please bring sufficient water.


Field Trip 1 - The Great Trossachs Forest (maximum attendees 50)

Coach departs EICC 08.30hrs and returns 18.00hrs

As part of the Scottish Forest Alliance, the Great Trossachs Forest is a visionary landscape scale forest restoration project in the heart of the Loch Lomond & Trossachs National Park. See how neighbouring land-owning organisations are working together to bring benefits to the individual partner organisations and to deliver the land management objectives for the benefit of biodiversity and people.

For more information, see http://www.scottishforestalliance.org.uk/default.asp?page=TheGreatTrossachsForest


Field Trip 2 - Perthshire Big Tree Country (maximum attendees 50)

Coach departs EICC 08.30hrs and returns 18.00hrs

Perthshire, in the heart of Scotland, has long been recognised as the centre of the Scottish forest renaissance, which began in the 18th century with the 'Planting' Dukes of Atholl. Some of the first conifer plantations anywhere were established by the 4th Duke for 'beauty, profit and effect' so today's foresters have up to 250 years experience of managing these man-made forests. In the 19th century tree introductions from the Pacific Northwest (many brought back by famous Perthshire plant hunters such as David Douglas) diversified the range of trees grown. All of this, allied to excellent growing conditions (many of the tallest trees in Europe are in Perthshire and other parts of Scotland) and a strong cultural tree and woodland heritage, have come together to promote 'Perthshire Big Tree Country'.

This tour will visit some of the original plantations around Dunkeld as well as walking in amongst some of Perthshire's collection of historic original introductions (including Douglas fir, European larch, giant redwood) and hear how the long history of tree introduction and re-forestation has influenced current forest management and policy development in a location declared a National Scenic Area on account of the quality of the wooded landscape. The tour will also include discussion on a new collaboration with the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh and the International Conifer Conservation Programme to create refugia for conifers from across the world threatened with habitat destruction.'

For more information, see http://www.perthshirebigtreecountry.co.uk/


Field Trip 3 - Nether Croy (maximum attendees 30)

Coach departs EICC 08.30hrs and returns 18.00hrs

This trip involves a day out with local Forestry Commission Scotland staff who deliver policy on the ground.  Nether Croy is a small site of 120 hectares near Kilsyth in central Scotland with a great deal packed into it.  The site is home to a section of the Antonine Wall (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), including a fort, and there are strong links with the area's industrial heritage, including an old railway line. Not only is the land important in historical terms, but it also contains old woodlands, grasslands and pastures which are a haven for newts and butterflies.

Enjoy a guided walking tour to see how a mosaic of open priority habitats and ancient woodland, European protected species, a World Heritage Site, industrial heritage (a legacy of mining, quarrying, and the Forth & Clyde canal) and the needs and wishes of the local communities, are all combined into one management area. The route takes in the Forth and Clyde canal, new planting for carbon sequestration, remediation of derelict land, a walk up Croy Hill, and along the line of the Antonine Wall. Weather permitting, the day should give you open views to the Campsie Hills to the north west, and the opportunity to see right across Scotland from the Firth of Clyde in the west to the Firth of Forth in the east.


Botanic LogoField Trip 4 – Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (maximum attendees 30)

14.00 –16.00hrs IMPORTANT note: please make your own way to the RBGE – it is a short bus ride or 25 minute walk from the EICC. Please see map for venue location. Further directions and maps will be provided when you register at the conference.

This visit will start at 14.00 with a welcome presentation on the work of the Garden followed by a guided tour with a particular emphasis on trees. The tour will be led by RBGE staff from the Horticulture Division.

Meeting point will be Main Reception, 20A Inverleith Row, Edinburgh EH3 5LR (please note this is a separate entrance from the East Gate) and participants will be directed to the Lecture Theatre where refreshments will be served.

1400 - Delegates arrive at Main Reception, 20A Inverleith Row
- Welcome presentation by Prof Stephen Blackmore (Regius Keeper) on the work of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (Lecture Theatre)
- Guided tour of the Garden with particular emphasis on trees with Martyn Dickson (Gardens Department Supervisor)

1600 - Delegates depart

For more information, see http://www.rbge.org.uk

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Side Events

Lunch can be taken into all lunchtime sessions.

Monday 28 June 2010

09.30 – 10.30

Old Research – The New Source of Evidence

Sponsored by Oxford University and the Forestry Commission

Open to all delegates although places will be limited.

This session will be led by Roger Mills and Gillian Petrokofsky from the Plant Science Department and Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford, supported by colleagues from the Cochrane Collaboration. They will explore the possibilities of establishing an evidence-based methodology in forest science, leading a discussion on how it can be brought about and who might participate in an international network of collaborators.

The session will take the form of an active workshop where delegates will be encouraged to contribute ideas and experiences.

Carrick


Tuesday 29 June 2010

12.45 – 13.30

The Iwokrama Model: Using a Forest without Losing it

Hosted by the Iwokrama International Centre, this session is open to all delegates although places will be limited. 

The Iwokrama Model: developing the concept of a truly sustainable rainforest in which modern and creative conservation practice and climate change science, environmental balance and economic use can be mutually reinforcing.

Tinto

18.00 – 19.30

Annual General Meeting of the Commonwealth Forestry Association
All welcome - to be followed by drinks and snacks

Carrick

18.45 – 20.00

Institute of Chartered Foresters President’s Reception (by invitation only)

Kilsyth



Wednesday 30 June 2010

13.15 – 14.20

CFA-ICF - Informal Meeting of Representatives of National Forestry Institutions & Associations 
(By invitation only)

The following three sessions are open to all delegates although places will be limited.

Moorfoot

13.05 – 14.25

IUCN - Breaking Down the Barriers to Locally Driven Restoration: The Key to Responding to Climate Change?

This side event, organised by IUCN, will provide examples of relatively small investments in breaking down barriers to locally-driven forest landscape restoration and forest management can yield potentially enormous pay-offs in terms of poverty reduction and economic growth. Case studies from IUCN’s field projects in Ghana and Uganda will illustrate how overcoming such local-level barriers is often a catalyst to realising a much greater contribution from forest resources to local, national and global economies and other societal needs, including climate change mitigation and adaptation. In addition to the Africa case studies, new data about the economic impacts and values associated with breaking down barriers to locally-driven restoration will also be presented.

Tinto

13.05 – 14.25

IUCN-WCPA - Specialist Group on Cultural & Spiritual Values of Protected Areas: Conserving the Commonwealth’s Sacred Forests as Nodes of Resilience to Climate Change: Towards a Strategy and Action Plan

Cultural, Sacred and Religious forests are probably the oldest protected areas on the planet. They range from small sacred groves to forested cultural landscapes. Found widely in the Commonwealth, they are strongly culturally rooted and often have high biodiversity values. A strategy and action plan for these forests will support their traditional custodians and being rooted in their communities can therefore be a call to action in countering the impacts of climate change. 

Kilsyth

13.05 – 14.05

CHEC - Tropical Field Station: Initiative for a Commonwealth Interchange on Tropical Rainforest Sustainable Management & Research

Excellent examples of combining training of local people, with university teaching and research and international collaboration through tropical rain forest conservation areas and associated field centres exist in several parts of the Commonwealth. The meeting is an exploratory discussion to develop a detailed proposal for an educational, training and indigenous people development programme supported by deeper, integrative forest research through exchange of ideas and experience to benefit all tropical forest peoples. (All are welcome).

Carrick

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Conference organisers: In Conference Ltd. www.in-conference.org.uk - Site by Source